Archive

Tag Archives: reader

Every now and then, I have to go back to the root of it all.

Why do I spend so much time on something that most would deem silly? How can I put so much into something that may not be … meant to be? Who do I think I am, to believe I could make it as an author, when no one knows who I am, there are so many writers just as, if not much more talented? Who do I think I am, the quiet girl, the introvert, with only less than a handful of people who have time to support this dream that I call my purpose? Just what type of person is crazy enough to put it all out there, keep trying, seeking feedback, hitting doors, hitting walls, picking herself up, and going right back into the unknown — that would be me. And any author (any artist, really) will tell you, it is so difficult, so humbling, so easy to quit, so easy to believe the naysayers, and those who say nothing at all as they, behind smiling eyes, wait for you to plummet.

I have to go back to the root of it all. Why do I spend so much time on something that very well could be … a dead end?

For those who feel caged in, and believe there is no way out, that it will never get better. For those who wake up every morning bruised, and go to bed sore, and out of shame, they don’t say a word to anyone. For those who live a silent battle that no one can see, that no one would believe. No one would believe that their life slips away with every moment … every invisible wound. For anyone who’s said no one understands, no one cares, no one is coming to save me. Anybody who’s been told, either aloud, or through the whispers of their own inner demons, that no one is coming to help. For that girl who has typed “lol” with tears in her eyes. For that girl who’s joked about it, but no one knew, she’d thought about it on lonely nights. She’d planned it all out in her head, and even as she joked, she meant it. For that guy who’s searching the bottom of an empty bottle — hurting himself, hurting others, breaking down, falling a part, giving in, but still fighting. For that guy who has replied “fine,” then gone home, and ended it all.

I have to remind myself, that although I may not reach millions, I might reach a few. That it’s bigger than likes, follow, comments, and shares. I have to remind myself. I have to remember why I am that type of person who is crazy enough to put it all out there, keep trying, seeking feedback, hitting doors, hitting walls, picking herself up, and going right back into the unknown. And I can never say never, but for now, I won’t quit.

Into the mind of character ‘Landon’  of  Just beneath the surface II

What I’m most proud of:

I can tell you what you’re about to say before you say it.

I can calculate, create and diffuse any emotion.

I am in control every second of every day; there’s no other way.

I can mold anything, anyone, any situation into what it needs to be.

What I’m least proud of:

My past … because some things are better left in the past.

If you were to ask me about trust:

That’s a multifaceted question. I’m not one of those people who lives a sad, sheltered life, constantly fearing getting hurt.

With trust, I believe first, you’d have to trust yourself; I trust me wholeheartedly. Everything else falls in line.

Women:

I keep it pretty simple: love her, help her, be faithful to her, be her everything. Die before I’d put my hands on a woman. I keep my relationships where they belong: between myself and the woman I am involved with.

What I could use a bit less of:
Being referred to as controlling. Being called a robot.

Robot. I’m starting to hate that word. What I hate even more than the word “robot,” is the way people turn control into a four letter word.

How do I get them to understand?

I learned a lot as a child, being in the midst of a storm.  I learned what I learned because I was the calm in that storm. Nobody could tell me control is wrong; control saved my life.

I learned part of the problem was, people were angry with me for being unaffected. Secretly, they too, value control. Someplace deep down, we all do. To help, fix, love, possess, control — are these things not at the root of  human nature?

If you’re not in control, where are you?
If you’re not centered, where are you?
If you’re not introspective, who are you?

Out of control, on the edge, lost …

Out of control, to me, sounds like an explosion — hell — I’ve been to that place. Hell if I go back.

landonmeme

Landon, a mysterious engineering student, has learned to treat his past as though it belongs to someone else. He has learned to control every thought that enters his mind: everything from his memories, to his smile, to the tone of his voice. Anyone who believes that they have begun to understand Landon is sadly mistaken. He is a man impenetrable.

His own brother, Peter, refers to Landon as a robot. Landon’s mother fears that he will soon self-destruct. Landon only wishes that everyone around him would accept and understand one thing; Landon has unlocked what he considers his most prized possession: the gift of control.

Seven is a peculiar beauty whose temper, harsh tongue and violent tendencies often get her into trouble. After meeting Landon, Seven finds her way into unchartered territory: his heart. Soon, Seven’s perception of herself is challenged. She is frequently urged to step away and reevaluate herself, as the handsome young man who is wise beyond his years gently coaches her into finding her best self.

As secrets are revealed, and an unspoken bond is formed, Landon and Seven grow to be inseparable.

Before long, the horrors of the past bring Landon full circle. As his soft stoic surface faces intrusion, his old self is relinquished to paranoia. In time, Landon’s world is threatened by the recurring nightmare he thought he had left behind.

So excited to announce that Just Beneath the Surface: Landon’s story, will be available this month. This is a soft release, which will officially begin November, 27, 2013!

To celebrate, I will share lots of character/book facts, excerpts, and more, (almost) daily leading up to the soft release date.

Are you ready for 27 “Landon’s Story” character facts?

Ready? Set? GOOooooo!

1. Landon’s name was originally James, then Quincy, then Quinton, then James.

Landon just seemed to fit.

2. Landon graduated high school at sixteen years old.

3. Seven, another main character in the novel, was kicked out of cosmetology school for fighting.

4. Seven has been arrested.

5. Landon’s sexuality is questioned multiple times.

6. Landon’s speaking voice, in my mind, is a lot like Evan Ross (son of Dianna Ross).

7. Seven, in my mind, sort of resembles Eartha Kitt.

8. Despite her temper, attitude, and lack of self-control, Seven is quite selfless and giving.

9. One of Seven’s best friends is named Maurice.

10. Landon runs early each morning.

11. Seven’s personal style, even the way she wears her makeup, changes when she is angry.

12. The olive branch is an important symbol in the book.

13. The owl is also an important symbol in the book.

Stop by tomorrow for a few more facts!

***


In Just Beneath the Surface II, new characters confront what has been buried and laid to rest – or so they thought.

Landon, a mysterious engineering student has learned to treat his past as though it belongs to someone else. He has learned to control every thought that enters his mind: everything from his memories, to his smile, to the tone of his voice. Anyone who believes that they have begun to understand Landon is sadly mistaken. He is a man impenetrable.

His own brother, Peter, refers to Landon as a robot. Landon’s mother fears that he will soon self-destruct. Landon only wishes that everyone around him would accept and understand one thing; Landon has unlocked what he considers his most prized possession: the gift of control.

Seven is a peculiar beauty whose temper, harsh tongue and violent tendencies often get her into trouble. After meeting Landon, Seven finds her way into unchartered territory: his heart. Soon, Seven’s perception of herself is challenged. She is frequently urged to step away and reevaluate herself, as the handsome young man who is wise beyond his years gently coaches her into finding her best self.

As secrets are revealed, and an unspoken bond is formed, Landon and Seven grow to be inseparable.

Before long, the horrors of the past bring Landon full circle. As his soft stoic surface faces intrusion, his old self is relinquished to paranoia. In time, Landon’s world is threatened by the recurring nightmare he thought he had left behind.

Close to twenty minutes later, after filling the bath tub with ice water, Landon lay beside Nova as she slept. Landon remembered meeting her when they were young, becoming best friends with her, and promising to never leave her. But as Nova became dependent on escaping the pain of their childhoods, she, without realizing it, had been the one to leave Landon – time and again.
Tears fell from his eyes and wet her skin. He removed her dress from her body before standing to his feet. He scooped her up into his arms and said: “This is the last time you do this to me. You hear me? The last time.”
Landon carried her to the bathtub, then closed his eyes. He kissed her forehead and whispered …

******

In Just Beneath the Surface II, new characters confront what has been buried and laid to rest – or so they thought.

Landon, a mysterious engineering student has learned to treat his past as though it belongs to someone else. He has learned to control every thought that enters his mind: everything from his memories, to his smile, to the tone of his voice. Anyone who believes that they have begun to understand Landon is sadly mistaken. He is a man impenetrable.

His own brother, Peter, refers to Landon as a robot. Landon’s mother fears that he will soon self-destruct. Landon only wishes that everyone around him would accept and understand one thing; Landon has unlocked what he considers his most prized possession: the gift of control.

Seven is a peculiar beauty whose temper, harsh tongue and violent tendencies often get her into trouble. After meeting Landon, Seven finds her way into unchartered territory: his heart. Soon, Seven’s perception of herself is challenged. She is frequently urged to step away and reevaluate herself, as the handsome young man who is wise beyond his years gently coaches her into finding her best self.

As secrets are revealed, and an unspoken bond is formed, Landon and Seven grow to be inseparable.

Before long, the horrors of the past bring Landon full circle. As his soft stoic surface faces intrusion, his old self is relinquished to paranoia. In time, Landon’s world is threatened by the recurring nightmare he thought he had left behind.

Just Beneath the Surface: Landon’s story ..
Coming soon

Bookworm’s Nook

a character’s perspective

 Hello, welcome back, and congratulations to Jordanna East!

This is a big day — the release date for Blood in the Past!!

About Blood in the Past: Jillian Atford falls for an older man, a handsome Philadelphia cop, whose mystery is that he’s married, a reality Jillian refuses to accept. Lyla Kyle finds her mother dead on the floor from an apparent suicide. She blames her philandering father and wastes no time taking her revenge. Detective Jason Brighthouse Sr. is in the wrong place at the right time to attempt to save a colleague from his burning home. When neither of them make it out alive, his teenage son can only harp on their last argument. He shoots himself in the head…with his father’s gun.

Three lives. Three deaths. One story. To understand the future, you must visit the past.

The Blood in the Past.

***

What are your favorite and least favorite parts of character development?

My favorite part is thinking up their back stories. What life experiences have caused them to choose the paths they choose. For example, Jillian Atford was a foster child, bounced around from bad homes to worse homes. So, when she falls for a married Calvin Kyle, she engages in the affair wholeheartedly. She’s just happy to have someone–who already has a family–show some interest in her. My least favorite part of character development is when I try to put myself in my characters’ shoes to figure out what a plausible response is to a particular situation. Like I said, we all have experiences that shape us, so my experiences might send me down a different path than that of my characters. Plus, I don’t want to end up pitying them for any reason. That’ll make it harder to kill them later.

(lol!!!)

Have you ever watched someone on television or in a movie, and been inspired to create or add to your own book character?

Actually, Law & Order SVU (reruns of which I have on in the background sometimes while I write) is what prompted me to give Jillian a foster family background. Also, I was a big Dexter fan when I first started writing Blood in the Paint (the full-length follow-up to Blood in the Past), which is why Lyla uses a syringe as her weapon of choice. Different drug though. Succinylcholine paralyzes and kills. Off the top of my head, I don’t know what Dexter uses. But if you’re not familiar with the show, it only knocks his victims out for a little while.

Who are some of your favorite good guy gone bad book characters?

I don’t wanna ruin anything for your readers, so SPOILER ALERT. Amy Dunne from Gone Girl.

Thanks, but I’m sure the 10 (maybe 8) readers won’t be offended, Jordanna …

Which of your book characters would be most likely to turn away from people, and spend his/her time talking to their pets and animals?

Umm, either Jillian or Lyla. Jillian is little too “unhinged” to even keep a house plant though, so I’m gonna go with Lyla. I was actually thinking of giving her a pet in the second full-length novel, the one after Blood in the Paint. SPOILER ALERT: Lyla Kyle Gets a Pet! Haha. Maybe I’m the one who’s unhinged…

If your main character faced time in prison, what would his/her last meal likely be?

I consider Lyla to be my main character, and she would probably choose assorted sushi rolls and ice cold beer. Leinenkugel, to be specific. Jillian has her own skeletons in her closet that may or may not land her in jail later on (hint, hint?), but I can tell you right now she won’t eat a thing.

In your opinion, can authors go too far in their characters’ physical description? How much should be left to the imagination, how much of the portrait should an author paint?

God, yes! Do you know why? Because of movie and television adaptations. If an author gives too many physical details and the actors and actresses aren’t a perfect match, fans end up in an uproar. It really is a pickle. All you really need is an approximate age, hair color, maybe eye color, and that’s kind of it. You’re better off describing personality traits. That makes the character seem more realistic anyway, in my opinion.

Many people have been reading the reviews for The Great Gatsby, myself included. I have read reviews stating that it is impressive, but would not move the audience. I have read that it is a terrific adaptation. I have also read that the film is dreadful. Which of your characters would see the movie at the theater, which characters would wait and rent the movie?

Haha, for some reason I see Jason Brighthouse seeing it in the theater. Blood in the Past takes place, you guessed it, in the past. But Blood in the Paint is present day, so his partner on the force would definitely give him grief for even wanting to see it. Lyla might get dragged to see it in the theater by one of her soon-to-be victims. Jillian would wait for DVD, when she could open a bottle of white wine and pass out before you could say West Egg.

Fun chat; thanks so much for stopping by!!

Would you like to find/follow/connect with Jordanna?

Blood in the Past — now available on Amazon

http://jordannaeast.com/

https://www.facebook.com/JordannaEast

https://twitter.com/JordannaEast

Bookworm’s Nook:

an avid reader’s perspective

Hello and welcome, Jordanna East!

Would you like to share a bit about yourself?

My “real” name is Ava Jordanna Easterby, but Jordanna East sounds catchier. *Cue eye wink* I started writing one day when I was broke and unemployed. My cable had been turned off and I was BORED. So I sat on my bed and started writing. I only got as far as nine chapters, but in 2012 I dove head first into writing and have been doing so ever since. Though now I have cable.
I’m currently working on a Pscyhological Thriller series, Blood for Blood. Introducing the series is a novella, Blood in the Past, due out this Spring. I’m also tinkering with a serialized novel about life in a cult. You can find me on Facebook (www.facebook.com/JordannaEast) and Twitter (https://twitter.com/JordannaEast). Also, you can sign up for exact release dates, special deals, and future events here http://jordannaeast.com/my-books/

When did you fall in love with reading?

When I was a young girl, my Italian-immigrant grandmother basically raised me. She was very strict with what I could and couldn’t watch on TV, what movies I could see, what music I could listen to. All that was fine with me though because I had a library card.

What is your favorite genre?

I gravitate toward all types of thrillers, but recently I’ve been branching out into YA, historical fiction, fantasy, and paranormal. Still no romance though. I’m just not a mushy girl, what can I say.

How do you choose the books you read/review?

I download books like other girls buy shoes! I browse through the lists on my Kindle and if a cover jumps out at me, I stop. I read the blurb. If it grabs me, I take a look at the reviews. If generally well-received and it’s not a million dollars, I buy it. And that’s how I ended up with almost 700 books on my Kindle…

Do you remember your first (favorite) paperback book?

Yes, it was Black Beauty. Not to be confused with the first book I ever read, Arabian Nights. Other kids started out with Doctor Seuss and graduated to Goosebumps. I STARTED out with Arabian Nights and graduated to Robin Cook and Stephen King, haha.

Do you remember the first e-book you purchased?

I purchased the Hunger Games trilogy and the Millenium Series (Girl with the Dragon Tattoo).

When reading, what types of characters do you find yourself relating to more than others?

Bad-ass women. Strong physically and mentally. Like I said, I’m not a mushy girl.

Are there books that you find yourself revisiting? (Either in your mind or literally picking up the book to reread it again and again).

I’ve never reread a book in my life. Don’t ask me why, I have no idea. As for revisiting in my mind, I’m often haunted by horrific scenes. Abuse, rape, senseless murder of children, etc. Not always, but sometimes.

Do you ever find yourself more connected with the darker

characters/antagonists in the books you read?

Always! That’s actually the reason I started my own books. I read quite a few crime thrillers and was sick of reading from the detectives’ point of view. So I wrote from the killer’s point of view. And they’re my favorite scenes to write.

Who is your all time favorite antagonist?

Moriarty from the Sherlock Holmes stories. Hands down. Recently though, I really loved the chick in Gone Girl. Talk about ruthless!

If you could introduce two characters from two different books you have read, who would they be and why?

Tris from Divergent and Katniss from the Hunger Games. They would be so kick-ass together!

What is your favorite movie adaptation of a book?

Okay, don’t judge me, but I actually loved the American version of Girl With the Dragon Tattoo. I’m wincing in anticipation of the backlash, haha.

What books have most inspired you to write, evolve and pursue writing your own novels?

I’m inspired by everything I read. The good, the bad, and the mediocre. Everyone has something to offer. Their dialogue, their description, their action verbs, their pace. I know that’s sort of a Miss America answer, but that’s how I feel.

I read an amazing quote, recently: “I write for those women who do not speak, for those who do not have a voice because they were so terrified, because we are taught to respect fear more than ourselves. We’ve been taught that silence would save us, but it won’t.” ~Audre Lorde — if you had to put your love of reading into words, what would you say?

Nothing so poignant, haha. No, seriously, I would say that stories have been around since cave drawings. To record history, to inspire, to teach, and to take the reader away from themselves. Because of this, I’m forever humbled by the written word.

Have you ever read a scene so powerful, that it stuck with you for hours, days, weeks, even months?

Yes. The rape/torture scene in Girl with Dragon Tattoo was awful, but in a well-written way. It was so awful that when I watched the movie, I fast-forwarded through it, because I had already seen it in my mind many times.
Great interview, awesome having you, Jordanna.
Thanks!
Connect with Jordanna: