“Addiction, dysfunction and co-dependence” #newrelease #interviews #freebie

How did you choose the genre you write in?

*I don’t think I chose it. I feel as if it chose me. Believe it or not, even back in the day, as a little girl playing Barbie’s (don’t laugh .. stop it .. I can hear you) I was creating very mature storylines. I never cared about buying the next trendy doll, so that I could pretend to be her, or treat her like a precious collectible item … I was, literally, writing stories in my mind, in elementary school.

Why did you feel you needed to write Like Shards of Glass?

*I was inspired by a number of things, some very personal to me: Addiction, dysfunction and co-dependence, stonewalling – a very dangerous form of emotional abuse, depression, and a recurring theme with me, blurring lines between monsters and ‘heroes’.

As I said above, I wanted to educate people about another form of emotional abuse: stonewalling. This can drive a person out of his/her mind, cause them to lash out, and make them look as if they are the one with “the problem.” Sadly, Monroe experiences this throughout her marriage, and comes to accept and thrive off of the pain her husband causes. Up until, and after, his death

In Like Shards of Glass, you tell the story through the viewpoints of multiple characters. Which characters were forthcoming with their story? Which characters were a bit more stubborn about telling their story?

*Oh, excellent question. Taking me a minute. My most stubborn character was Karter, the husband. I actually couldn’t too much stomach him, because of what he did. It was difficult for me to want to get into his head, and so, I described who he once was, instead of what he did. Also, Dominique, Monroe’s young lover, left me stumped every now and then, because I wanted to create someone who appeared to be one thing, and by the end, he was something completely different. Read More >> Lusty Penguins Review Interview

addiction2

And in the beginning, there was Monroe, her husband, and her sons. This was a family unit which was broken to begin with. No, I don’t mean broken in an obvious way, but in a way that is felt, never seen, and at times, not heard.

The home is described as a glacier. There are signs and signals, such as Carter, Monroe’s husband’s appetite. These signals make it clear to Monroe whether or not she exists, for in Carter’s mind, she is a poisonous masterpiece. He loves her, yet distances himself without explanation. And as many mothers/parents do, Monroe does not realize that this deeply affects Karter, her oldest son.

I was inspired by a number of things. Some very personal to me. One of them being, wanting to educate people about another form of emotional abuse: stonewalling. This can drive a person out of his/her mind, cause them to lash out, and make them look as if they are the one with “the problem.” Sadly, Monroe experiences this throughout her marriage, and comes to accept and thrive off of the pain her husband causes. Up until, and after, his death.

Even thinking about the way Carter took the lives of innocent people, and the lives of his own (younger) children, is sickening. I know I wrote the book, but I was a bit skittish about the way I approached this aspect of the book. It was in the room, always present, hovering, ominous, but no details leaked into the atmosphere of the story. It just wasn’t on my heart to include those details. The details I did include, where the fragile, horrifying state of mind, of a woman who’d lost everything she had. Read More >> Like Shards of Glass Guest Post

 

C’mon. Won’t you give a (somewhat) new author a try? Download a free sample? Here >>Like Shards of Glass (Amazon)

Download a free novel >> Just Beneath the Surface (Amazon)

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s